Category: Festivals

GrossFest Showcases Diverse Array Of Indie Horror

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Slaughter Drive

On July 28GrossFest, a convention dedicated to indie horror filmmakers and fans, will debut at George Washington Hotel in Washington, PA with a day full of movies (including some local ones), vendors and more. See featured films below:

She Was So Pretty (2016)

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Valerie Vestron is looking for a vacation from her life. Her friends get her out of the house and to a secluded cabin. They plan to throw back some beer and unwind for the weekend, but they get more than they bargained for.

10/31 (2017)

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A Halloween treat bag of all the things that go bump in the night. From masked killers to scarecrows, witches, and tricksters, there’s a scare for everyone in this anthology of horror and the macabre. The film is the directorial debut for Rocky Gray, the former drummer of the band Evanescence, and includes a vignette from Justin M. Seaman of the Pittsburgh-produced horror indie, The Barn.

B-Documentary Part Two (2018)

GrossFest will present the premiere of the follow-up to B-Documentary, a film about independent filmmakers starting their careers, film vs. digital, how to make it in the business without giving in to Hollywood standards, and more.

Slaughter Drive (2017)

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When failed filmmaker Doug Stevenson leaves his video camera in the local park overnight, he accidentally records something horrific. To top it off, it might have something to do with his new neighbors that moved into his quiet suburban neighborhood. With the help of his bumbling teacher buddies, Doug goes on a wild ride to save himself, his friends, his ex-wife, and the entire neighborhood. Directed by Ben Dietels and starring Steve RudzinskiDavid OgrodowskiJack Davis, and Vincent Bombara.

Fist of Jesus (2012)

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Jesus fights zombies with fish and performs other great deeds in this bizarre Spanish-language short film by David Muñoz and Adrián Cardona.

CarousHELL (2016)

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Duke hates his job. He has to let kids climb on his back and ride him for hours every single day. But one brat finally pushed him too far. Duke has broken free of his ride and is on a bloody rampage of revenge. He’s going to murder that kid and anyone that gets in his way.

Winners Tape All (2016)

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The story of Michael and Richard Henderson, two stepbrothers from West Virginia who saw an opportunity in the burgeoning VHS market in the 1980s and made their own backyard horror movies, The Curse of Stabberman and Cannibal Swim Club. These films would’ve been long forgotten, but a recent resurgence in horror fans collecting rare VHS tapes has put the Henderson Brothers back in the spotlight. Thanks to their biggest fan, they’re sitting down for their first on-camera interview and looking back on their movies – but they might not be as good as they remembered.

The Litch (2018)

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Rotting flesh crawled out the ditch. He’s not a demon or a witch. Run for your life, here comes the Litch!

Doors for GrossFest open at 11 a.m. The program includes a GrossFest awards ceremony at 4 p.m. 

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Row House Gets Neighborly With Pittsburgh Children’s International Film Festival

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Won’t You Be My Neighbor?/Focus Features

From July 27August 2, Row House Cinema will present the 2018 Pittsburgh International Children’s Film Festival, a celebration featuring a curated selection of international movies and short films, storytimes, treats, craft activities, and more.

The event includes works from the Czech Republic, Russia, Japan, and 11 other countries, as well as classic and new kid-friendly films.

“This year’s selections include artful and beautiful animation and thoughtful storylines that are engaging for adults and children,” said festival director Brian Mendelssohn in an official press release. “We’re so excited to bring them to Pittsburgh.”

The festival opens with Won’t You Be My Neighbor?, the acclaimed documentary about children’s television pioneer and Pittsburgh hero, Fred Rogers. For over 30 years, Rogers, an unassuming minister, puppeteer, writer, and producer, was beamed daily into homes across America. In his beloved television program, Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood, he and his cast of puppets and friends spoke directly to young children about some of life’s weightiest issues, in a simple, direct fashion. In Won’t You Be My Neighbor?, Academy Award-winning filmmaker Morgan Neville (Twenty Feet from Stardom) looks back on the legacy of Rogers, focusing on his radically kind ideas. The screening includes a special guest speaker and Mr. Rogers themed t-shirts from Steel City on sale in the lobby.

The lineup showcases compilations of the best short films from the 2018 New York International Children’s Film Festival, the narration-free insect documentary Microcosmos, and The Oddsockeaters, a Czech film about strange sock-stealing creatures. Also included are the classic 1971 fantasy film Willy Wonka and The Chocolate Factory and the 2018 Disney/Pixar blockbuster Incredibles 2.

The festival will also host the premiere of Joana and the Bad Guys, a 25-minute stop-motion film written, filmed, and produced by kindergarten students at the Kentucky Avenue School in Shadyside.

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Incredibles 2

Row House Cinema will play movies at a lower volume to protect young ears and provide kid-friendly snacks at storytime screenings and sock puppet making.  In the spirit of the festival, children are welcome to move around the theater, chat, and just be kids.

Movie tickets can be purchased individually, or a pass is available to see unlimited films for the entire week.

 

2018 JFilm Festival Highlights Jewish Baseball Players, Musicians And More

Itzhak Perlman at home - courtesy of Greenwich Entertainment

Itzhak/Greenwich Entertainment

The JFilm Festival returns to bring 11 days of international Jewish-themed films, guest speakers, and more to various venues throughout the region. This year’s lineup features the Pittsburgh premieres of 20 narrative and documentary films from 12 countries.

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Heading Home: The Tale of Team Israel

The event opens on April 26 with Heading Home: The Tale of Team Israel, a documentary about childhood friends from summer camp who visit Israel to make a movie about Jewish baseball players, never dreaming it would turn into a run for Team Israel at the 2017 World Baseball Classic. The screening includes a Q&A with Pittsburgh native and MLB.com reporter Jonathan Mayo, who appears in the film, and a pop-up after-party.

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Sammy Davis, Jr.: I’ve Gotta Be Me

Other documentaries in the line-up include Sammy Davis, Jr.: I’ve Gotta Be Me and Monsieur Mayonnaise. Helmed by award-winning filmmaker Sam PollardSammy Davis, Jr.: I’ve Gotta Be Me explores the achievements and tensions that surrounded the career of entertainer Sammy Davis, Jr., including his conversion to Judaism and his tumultuous relationship with Black America.

Sponsored by the Holocaust Center of Pittsburgh, Monsieur Mayonnaisfollows French-born Australian artist and cult filmmaker Philippe Mora as he uncovers his father’s remarkable exploits in the French Resistance and his mother’s miraculous escape from a prison camp. The story is told through a montage of found footage and Mora’s own artistic renditions.

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Monsieur Mayonnaise

Among the narrative films showcased is the comedy Humor Me. Faced with a midlife crisis, Nate (Jemaine Clement), a struggling playwright, moves into a New Jersey retirement community with his father (Elliott Gould). Filmmaker Sam Hoffman’s directorial debut also stars Annie Potts, Bebe Neuwirth, and Erich Bergen, who will appear at the festival.

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Humor Me

Representing Pittsburgh is local filmmaker David Bernabo, who will premiere his work In a Dark Wood. The documentary charts the path of composer and University of Pittsburgh music composition professor Mathew Rosenblum’s “Lament/Witches’ Sabbath,” a highly personal concerto written for world-famous clarinetist/composer David Krakauer.

In a Dark Wood - WEB

In a Dark Wood

Other films include the Dutch historical drama An Act of Defiance, the Israeli/German drama The Cakemaker, and Itzhak, Alison Chernick‘s documentary about legendary violinist Itzhak Perlman. The festival will also present a number of Q&As with various directors and actors and three sessions of Film Schmooze, a casual post-film discussion led by local scholars and sponsored by the University of Pittsburgh’s Jewish Studies Program.

See the JFilm website for showtimes and ticket prices. Screenings will take place at SouthSide Works Cinema and other select locations, including AMC Mount Lebanon 6, the Hollywood Theater in Dormont, and Seton Hill University in Greensburg.

Pittsburgh Underground Film Festival Returns With Riveting Docs And More

Queercore: How to Punk a Revolution

From April 2022, Reel Q brings back the Pittsburgh Underground Film Festival (PUFF) for a weekend of thought-provoking works about the LGBTQIA+ experience. The event includes a diverse array of feature-length and short documentaries addressing various aspects of LGBTQIA+ history and culture, including the HIV/AIDS crisis and the LGBTQIA+ influence on punk music. See schedule and details below:

April 20

8:30 p.m.

Idol Worship: An Evening with Mink Stole and Peaches Christ

Idol-WorshipMink-and-Peaches

PUFF opens with a special presentation of Idol Worship: An Evening with Mink Stole and Peaches Christ at the Regent Square Theater. The show is an intimate, revelatory, and heartfelt happening that takes the form of a chat/variety show starring living legend and cult film icon Mink Stole, and is hosted by drag impresario and filmmaker Peaches Christ. The dynamic duo have been close friends for almost two decades and would like to invite you to join them for this special happening. With interviews, stories, film clips, anecdotes and live song this is a wildly entertaining, and uncensored exposé that aspires to be as hilarious as it is revealing.

Tickets cost $15 in advance, $20 a the door. VIP tickets are available for $40 in advance, $45 at the door. VIP tickets include a meet-and-greet with Mink Stole and Peaches Christ, an exclusive Q&A, early venue access, and reserved seats.

April 21

In Full Bloom (2015)

1 p.m. (Doors 12:30 p.m.)

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The feature-length documentary by Michael D. Brewer chronicles the lives of 15 actors (13 transgender and 2 gay) whose paths cross during the production of Lovely Bouquet of Flowers, the unprecedented stage play created and written by Jazzmun Nichcala and director David Hays Gaddas. Fiction becomes reality, when behind-the-scenes footage of the rehearsal process and vignettes from the climactic performance are interwoven with expert testimonies and compelling personal interviews from the cast, that deal with family, inner conflicts, coming out, surgery, hormones, and the complexities of sexual identity and orientation. By sharing their own journeys and speaking to issues, such as relationships, spirituality, and careers, the film challenges the viewer to move past stereotypes and to see the commonalities we all share as human beings.

In Full Bloom screens at the Melwood Screening Room. The event is free and open to the public. Registration required.

Nothing Without Us: The Women Who Will End AIDS (2017)

4 p.m. (Doors 3:30 p.m.)

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Directed by Harriet HirshornNothing Without Us tells the story of the inspiring women at the forefront of the global AIDS movement. Combining archival footage and interviews with female activists, scientists and scholars in the US and Africa, the film reveals how women not only shaped grassroots groups like ACT-UP in the U.S. but have also played essential roles in HIV prevention and the treatment access movement throughout sub-Saharan Africa. The film explores the unaddressed dynamics that keep women around the world at risk of HIV while introducing the remarkable women who have the answers to ending this 30-year old pandemic.

Nothing Without Us screens at the Melwood Screening Room. Tickets cost $10.

Queercore: How to Punk a Revolution (2017)

7 p.m. (Doors 6:30 p.m.)

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Director Yony Leyser presents the story of Queercore, the cultural and social movement that began in the mid-1980s as an offshoot of punk and was distinguished by its discontent with society’s disapproval of the gay, bisexual, lesbian and transgender communities. Underscoring interviews from figures such as Bruce LaBruce, G.B. Jones, Genesis Breyer P-Orridge, John Waters, Kim Gordon, and many more are clips from movies, zines, concerts, and actions iconic to the movement. As steeped in the radical queer, anti-capitalist, DIY, and give-no-fucks approach as queercore itself, the movie reveals the perspectives and experiences of bands, moviemakers, writers, and other outsiders, taking audiences inside the creation of the community—and art—so desperately needed by the same queers it encompassed.

Queercore screens at the Melwood Screening Room. Tickets cost $10. A free dance party at P-Town Bar will follow the screening.

April 22

Expanding Gender: Youth Out Front

1 p.m. (Lunch 12:30 p.m.)

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This short film program includes four documentaries that explore the varied identities of trans and gender-expansive youth and young adults. Selected works include TomgirlA Place in the Middle, Monica’s Story, and Passing.

Expanding Gender: Youth Out Front screens at the Melwood Screening Room. Admission is pay-what-you-can.

Tongues Untied (1989)

3 p.m. (Doors 2:30 p.m.)

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Directed by Marlon Riggs, Tongues Untied blends documentary footage with personal account and fiction in an attempt to depict the specificity of Black gay identity. Besides detailing North American black gay culture, Riggs recounts his own experiences as a gay man, including the realization of his sexual identity and of coping with the deaths of many of his friends to AIDS. Other elements include footage of the Civil Rights Movement and clips of Eddie Murphy performing a homophobic stand-up routine. The film is a part of a body of recently released films and videos that examine central issues in the lives of lesbian and gay Black people. Riggs’ work challenged television’s generic boundaries of conformity during the late 80s and early 90s. The television documentary during this time was the conventional talking head, expert interviews, and personal testimonials commonly on public affair issues.

Tongues Untied screens at the Melwood Screening Room. Admission is pay-what-you-can.

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Pittsburgh Japanese Film Festival Gets Wild With Cats, Cult Films & Classic Kaiju

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Row House Cinema will offer two weeks of great Japanese cinema with the third annual Pittsburgh Japanese Film Festival (JFFPgh). The event strives to strengthen the general understanding of Japanese culture by providing audiences in Pittsburgh with cutting-edge, original films depicting authentic representations of Japan.

“The festival is growing so fast, we had to expand it to two weeks this year, making it one of the largest Japanese film festivals in the country,” festival director Brian Mendelssohn said in an official statement.

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Neko Atsume House

The festival opens on April 6 with the Pittsburgh premiere of Neko Atsume House. Based on the mobile game sensation Neko Atsume, it follows a struggling novelist who develops a special relationship with a cat that has an unusual way of easing his anxieties. VIP guests will get to cuddle kittens in the Bierport Tap Room before the film.

The festival schedule will focus on four selections that push gender roles and sexual boundaries in Japan, including Stray Cat Rock: Sex Hunter, Urotsukidoji, and Antiporno. Also included are the classic samurai films Yojimbo and Sanjuro from Japanese auteur Akira Kurosawa, as well as a brand new restoration of Ishiro Honda’s 1954 monster masterpiece Godzilla.

The festival schedule will focus on four selections that push gender roles and sexual boundaries in Japan, including Stray Cat Rock: Sex Hunter, Urotsukidoji: Legend Of The Overfiend, and Antiporno. Also included are the classic samurai films Yojimbo and Sanjuro from Japanese auteur Akira Kurosawa, as well as a brand new restoration of Ishiro Honda’s 1954 monster masterpiece Godzilla.

Pretty Guardian Sailor Moon: The Musical – Le Mouvement Final (2018)

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In this filmed version of the Japanese musical, Usagi Tsukino says farewell to Mamoru Chiba as he is set to leave for school in America. As Usagi says goodbye, she faints, and a super idol group called the Three Lights appear to catch her fall. Meanwhile, new groups calling themselves Sailor Guardians appear, but are they friend or foe?

The Day Of The Western Sunrise (2018)

A film expertly animated and produced by local Pittsburghers, The Day of the Western Sunrise tells a true story of a surprise atomic bomb test from the perspective of fishermen on the sea nearby – and in the path of danger.

Yojimbo (1961)

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Wandering samurai Sanjuro finds himself in a rough gambling town run by two warlords and their hired thugs. While Sanjuro sets out to rid the town of all these pestilences by playing the two warlords off against each other, his efforts are complicated by the arrival of the son of one of the gangsters, who owns a revolver.

Sanjuro (1962)

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This sequel to Yojimbo draws wandering samurai Sanjuro into the local politics of a group of young men determined to clean up corruption in their town. However, the town’s evil Superintendent is determined to kill off anyone standing in his way, so it’s up to Sanjuro’s cunning and swordcraft to ensure that the Superintendent’s plan does not come to fruition.

Your Name (2016)

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Your Name

The fourth highest-grossing film of all time in Japan and the fifth highest-grossing non-English film worldwide tells the story of a high school girl in rural Japan and a high school boy in Tokyo who swap bodies. They build a connection by leaving notes for one another until they wish to finally meet, but something stronger than distance may keep them apart.

Antiporno (2017)

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Antiporno

Director Sion Sono takes on the Japanese movie studio Nikkatsu’s Roman Porno (romantic pornography) works of the 1970s and 80s in this film-within-a-film. Fashion star Kioko is bored in her apartment, waiting for a meeting with Watanabe, a chief-editor who’s interviewing her. In the domination and humiliation game between her and her assistant, the roles will slowly invert. Unless it’s all fiction?

Godzilla (1954)

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Godzilla

See the monster movie that spawned a multimedia franchise, including 32 feature films and that has been recognized by Guinness World Records as the longest-running film franchise in history. Created by the H-bomb, a 164-foot-tall dinosaur-like monster begins a rampage that threatens to destroy Japan and the rest of the world. Can the monster be destroyed before it’s too late?

Stray Cat Rock: Sex Hunter (1970)

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Stray Cat Rock: Sex Hunter

The third in a series of five films which depict a gang of vicious teenage schoolgirls who get their kicks from gang fights, street muggings, and rock and roll. This time Mako and her gang The Alleycats clash with racist macho pigs The Eagles after Mako starts dating an Afro-Japanese man. Row House will screen a new restoration of the film.

Urotsukidoji: Legend Of The Overfiend (1989)

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Urotsukidoji: Legend Of The Overfiend

The precursor to the infamous genre of tentacle porn, this complicated horror/fantasy/erotica tells of parallel realms of demons and man-beasts and a 3000-year-old legend that foretells the coming of the Overfiend—a being of unimaginable power that will unite all three realms into a land of eternity.

* Please note that some films in the festival contain graphic sexual imagery or sexual violence and may not be suitable for everyone.

The Pittsburgh Japanese Film Festival takes place from April 6-19 at Row House Cinema. Tickets cost $9 general admission, $7 for matinees before 6 p.m. Opening night event tickets cost $15-30 and $10 for closing night. Discounts apply to college students, Lawrenceville residents, and guests who come in costume. You can also purchase a full festival pass for $36.

Pitt Presents Three Films For Serbian Movie Festival

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Santa Maria della Salute

On March 24, the University of Pittsburgh will host the Serbian Movie Festival. Presented by the Serb National Federation, the Center for Russian & East European Studies and the Radio Television of Serbia, the event includes three of the country’s most popular movies from 2016 and 2017. See schedule and details below:

2 p.m.

The Promise (Dir. Zeljko Mirkovic, 2016)

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In this documentary from Zeljko Mirkovic, a French family moves to a remote village in the north of Serbia. They believe they have found a promised land for growing grapes and wine-making. But they also face distrusting locals with old habits. A new challenge awaits them back home in France – persuading sommeliers that superior wine can be made in an unknown and problematic region. Can they awake hope and breathe a new life into the old village?

3:30 p.m.

Serbs on Corfu (dir. Sladjana Zaric, 2016)

A documentary by Radio Television of Serbia describing one of the most tragic events faced by the Serbian people – the exile of the entire nation, army, and government of Serbia to the island Corfu, Greece during World War I. In order to avoid a capitulation of their country to the Austro-Hungary Empire, the Serbian Government and army (including the civilian population) decide to leave their own country and cross Albania during the dead of winter to reach the Allies at the Adriatic Sea. This was a unique case in world history that an entire nation immigrated to save their lives.

6 p.m.

Santa Maria della Salute (Dir. Zdravko Sotra, 2016)

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A story about the love between beloved Serbian poet Laza Kostic and his friend’s daughter, Lenka Dundjerski. The affair inspired one of the most beautiful love poems of Serbian and European poetry, Santa Maria della Salute. The biopic went on to become one of the most popular movies in Serbia in 2016 and 2017.

All screenings will take place in Room 232 of the Cathedral of Learning. All movies will be shown with English subtitles. Pizza and light refreshments will be provided between the first two films. Admission is free and open to the public.

CMU International Film Festival Looks At Faces Of (In)Equality

human flow

Human Flow

From March 22-April 8, the Carnegie Mellon University International Film Festival (CMUIFF) will present documentaries, narrative films, and shorts from all over the world examining the festival’s 2018 theme Faces of (In)Equality. Inspired by a quote from author Kurt Vonnegut – “The year was 2081, and everybody was finally equal” – the featured works are meant to explore “what it means to be equal or unequal in any of these words’ multiple senses and connotations.” The festival also includes director appearances, panel discussions, and more. See a film schedule and details below:

March 22

7 p.m.

Life and Nothing More Opening Reception

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The festival opens with the Pittsburgh premiere of Life and Nothing More (Spain/USA, 2017). The work by Antonio Méndez Esparza (Aquí y Allá) stands as a story about ordinary people, all played by nonprofessional actors. In it, a single mother with a haunted and unforgiving past struggles to make ends meet with her three children in Florida. The event will take place in CMU’s McConomy Auditorium and includes a reception and Q&A with Esparza. Tickets cost $15 general/$10 seniors & students
and are available online or at the door. 

March 23

7 p.m.

The Doctor From India (US, 2018)

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Directed by Jeremy Frindel (One Track Heart: The Story of Krishna Das), The Doctor From India is the fascinating story of one man’s mission to bring the ancient healthcare system of wellness called Ayurveda from India to the West in the late 1970s. In this meditative, immersive portrait, with interviewees including Ayurvedic practitioner Deepak Chopra, Frindel documents the life and work of Dr. Vasant Lad who, fulfilling his destiny as foretold by his family guru became a holistic health pioneer, helping to bring Ayurveda, which was almost unknown when he first arrived in the west, to become one of the most prominent alternative health systems in the world today. 

March 24

3 p.m.

Spoor (Poland, 2017)

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Based on Olga Tokarczuk‘s best-selling novel Drive Your Plough Over the Bones of the Dead, this ecological thriller from director Agnieszka Holland follows a retired engineer and animal rights activist who lives alone in the Klodzko Valley on the Czech-Polish border. When the mysterious deaths of local hunters are blamed on animal attacks, she suspects something far more sinister.

7 p.m.

For Ahkeem (US, 2017)

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After a school fight lands 17-year old Daje Shelton in a court-supervised alternative high school, she’s determined to turn things around and make a better future for herself in her rough St. Louis neighborhood. But focusing on school is tough as she loses multiple friends to gun violence, falls in love for the first time, and becomes pregnant with a boy, Ahkeem, just as Ferguson erupts a few miles down the road. Through Daje’s intimate coming-of-age story, For Ahkeem illuminates challenges that many Black teenagers face in America today, and witnesses the strength, resilience, and determination it takes to survive.

March 25

4:30 p.m.

Beauty & the Dogs (Tunisia/France, 2017)

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When Mariam, a young Tunisian woman, is raped by police officers after leaving a party, she is propelled into a harrowing night in which she must fight for her rights even though justice lies on the side of her tormentors. Employing impressive cinematic techniques and anchored by a tour-de-force performance from newcomer Mariam Al Ferjani, Kaouther Ben Hania‘s film tells an urgent, unapologetic, and important story head-on.

March 28

6 p.m.

Scarred Hearts (Romania, 2016)

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During the summer of 1937, Emanuel, a young man in his early twenties, is committed to a sanatorium on the Black Sea coast for treatment of his bone tuberculosis. The treatment consists of painful spine punctures that confine him to a body cast on a stretcher-bed. Little by little, as Emanuel gets accustomed to the limitations of his new life, he discovers that inside the sanatorium there is still a life to be lived to the fullest.

March 29

7 p.m.

BPM (Beats Per Minute) (France, 2017)

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In Paris in the early 1990s, a group of activists goes to battle for those stricken with HIV/AIDS, taking on sluggish government agencies and major pharmaceutical companies in bold, invasive actions. The organization is ACT UP, and its members, many of them gay and HIV-positive, embrace their mission with a literal life-or-death urgency. Amid rallies, protests, fierce debates and ecstatic dance parties, the newcomer Nathan falls in love with Sean, the group’s radical firebrand, and their passion sparks against the shadow of mortality as the activists fight for a breakthrough.

March 30

7 p.m.

The Departure (US, 2017)

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Ittetsu Nemoto, a former punk-turned-Buddhist-priest in Japan, has made a career out of helping suicidal people find reasons to live. But this work has come increasingly at the cost of his own family and health, as he refuses to draw lines between his patients and himself. The Departure captures Nemoto at a crossroads when his growing self-destructive tendencies lead him to confront the same question his patients ask him: what makes life worth living?

March 31

7 p.m.

Short Film Competition

The 2018 Short Film Competition will take place at the Melwood Screening Room.

April 1

4 p.m.

Clash (Eshtebak) (Egypt, 2016)

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Set entirely in an 8m police truck, a number of detainees from different political and social backgrounds are brought together by fate, during the turmoil that followed the ousting of former president Morsi from power.

April 4

7 p.m.

Risk (US, 2016)

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Laura Poitras (Citizenfour) returns with her most personal and intimate film to date. Filmed over six years, Risk is a complex and volatile character study that collides with a high stakes election year and it’s controversial aftermath. Cornered in a tiny building for half a decade, Julian Assange is undeterred even as the legal jeopardy he faces threatens to undermine the organization he leads and fracture the movement he inspired. Capturing this story with unprecedented access, Poitras finds herself caught between the motives and contradictions of Assange and his inner circle. In a new world order where a single keystroke can alter history, Risk is a portrait of power, betrayal, truth, and sacrifice.

April 5

3:30 p.m. and 7 p.m.

Mali Blues (German, 2016)

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For centuries, traditional music has unified Mali’s society. Yet the music of Mali is in jeopardy. Radical Islamists introduced sharia law, prohibited dance and secular music and destroyed instruments. Mali Blues tells the story of four musicians who refuse to accept hatred, suspicion, violence and a radical interpretation of Islam in their country.

The 3:30 p.m. screening takes place at Carlow University, University Commons 323. The 7 p.m. screening takes place at the Carnegie Museum of Art Theater.

April 6

7 p.m.

Bombshell: The Hedy Lamarr Story (US, 2017)

ZIEGFELD GIRL, Hedy Lamarr, 1941

What do the most ravishingly beautiful actress of the 1930s and 40s and the inventor whose concepts were the basis of cellphone and Bluetooth technology have in common? They are both Hedy Lamarr, the glamour icon whose ravishing visage was the inspiration for Snow White and Cat Woman and a technological trailblazer who perfected a secure radio guidance system for Allied torpedoes during WWII. Weaving interviews and clips with never-before-heard audio tapes of Hedy speaking on the record about her incredible life—from her beginnings as an Austrian Jewish emigre to her scandalous nude scene in the 1933 film Ecstasy to her glittering Hollywood life to her ground-breaking, but completely uncredited inventions to her later years when she became a recluse, impoverished and almost forgotten.

April 7

6:30 p.m.

Pendular (Brazil/Argentina/France, 2017)

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The debut feature from Julia Murat follows an unnamed young couple, a sculptor and a dancer. They have just moved into a massive loft, with a ceremonial ribbon of tape laid down the center to mark where the sculptures will be displayed and the dances performed. Gradually the young artists’ works bleed together and inspire one another, moving the rhythm of the loft back and forth like a body rocking in a chair. With intense sexual imagery and unforgettable original art pieces, the film is an incredible collaboration that melds sculpture, dance, and film in perfect balance.

April 8

4 p.m.

Human Flow Closing Night Reception

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Over 65 million people around the world have been forced from their homes to escape famine, climate change, and war in the greatest human displacement since WWII. Human Flow (China/Germany/USA, 2017), an epic film journey led by the internationally renowned artist Ai Weiwei, gives a powerful visual expression to this massive human migration. The documentary elucidates both the staggering scale of the refugee crisis and its profoundly personal human impact. Captured over the course of an eventful year in 23 countries, the film follows a chain of urgent human stories that stretches across the globe in countries including Afghanistan, Bangladesh, France, Greece, Germany, Iraq, Israel, Italy, Kenya, Mexico, and Turkey, from teeming refugee camps to perilous ocean crossings to barbed-wire borders.

All screenings take place in CMU’s McConomy Auditorium unless otherwise noted. General admission tickets to the opening night film and reception are $15, $10 for seniors and students. General admission tickets for all other screenings are $10, $5 for seniors and students. Full-access festival passes are available for $50, $25 for seniors and students. All tickets are available for purchase at the CMUIFF Faces of (In)Equality website.

Black Bottom Film Festival Returns To The August Wilson Center

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Magnificent Life of Charlie

The Pittsburgh Cultural Trust and the August Wilson Center continue to showcase African-American contributions to cinema with another edition of the Black Bottom Film Festival. From February 23-25, the event features a selection of full-length films, shorts, and documentaries that focus on “the recurring themes of spirituality, race, family conflict, honor, duty and working-class struggle, themes ever-present in August Wilson’s The Pittsburgh Cycle plays.” The event will also include intimate Q&As, a dance party, and workshops for writers and actors.

See event schedule and details below:

February 23

5:30 p.m.

Pittsburgh Short Films

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Tale of Four

The Pittsburgh Short Films program will present two selections, the documentary Wendell Freeland: A Silent Soldier (dir. Billy Jackson) and the drama Tale of Four ( dir. Gabourey Sidibe).

Wendell Freeland: A Silent Soldier tells the story of the late Wendell Grimkie Freeland, a Pittsburgh African American leader, attorney, activist, and Tuskegee Airman who worked quietly, but effectively, on significant civil rights battles. As a young Army Air Corp officer during World War II, he risked court marshall and death for defying racist orders to respect segregated officers’ facilities on an Indiana U.S. Army base. He also engaged in successful Pittsburgh battles for civil rights in public accommodations, police conduct towards Black citizens, fair housing, economic opportunity, and other matters. The film includes interviews with various subjects, including Freeland himself, as well as archival photos and footage.

With Tale of Four, Academy Award and Golden Globe-nominated actress, Gabourey Sidibe makes her directorial debut in a multi-layered story that spans one day in the life of four different women who are connected through their quest for love, agency, and redemption. Inspired by Nina Simone’s song, “Four Women,” this film examines four separate stories reflective of multi-faceted African American women connected by the inner city building that they live in, ultimately converge on one fateful day through unheralded acts of bravery.

6 p.m.

TruthSayers Speaker Series Presents: April Reign

This event will feature guest April Reign, creator of the viral hashtag #OscarsSoWhite.

8 p.m.

Love Jones (dir. Theodore Witcher)

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Say hello to Darious Lovehall and Nina Mosley, two confused lovebirds who discover that you can never underestimate the power of a love jones. Stars Larenz Tate, Nia Long, and Khalil Kain. The event includes a pre-screening Q&A with Kain.

10 p.m.

90’S Themed After Party with DJ Selecta

February 24

1:30 p.m.

Odds Against Tomorrow (dir. Robert Wise)

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Harry Belafonte produced and stars in this 1959 crime drama about a man who hires two very different debt-burdened men for a bank robbery until suspicion and prejudice threaten to end their partnership.

5 p.m.

Cinderella Man (dir. Ron Howard)

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The work of production designer and 2018 Black Bottom Film Festival Cinematic Excellence Awardee, Wynn Thomas, will be on display when the festival screens the 2005 period drama, Cinderella Man. The Oscar-nominated film stars Russell Crowe as James Braddock, a supposedly washed-up professional prizefighter who came back to become the Heavyweight Champion of the World and a national hero in the 1930’s. A Q&A and awards ceremony for Thomas will take place at 3 p.m. before the screening.

8 p.m.

Double Play (dir. Ernest Dickerson)

DoublePlay

Based on the book by Frank Martinus Arion, Double Play is a vibrant, multi-textural drama set against the beauty and bittersweet complexity of Curacao, where poverty and wealth are two sides of the same coin. In a high stakes game of dominoes, players confront their lust, desperation, rage, and remorse with deadly consequences. Directed by Ernest Dickerson, this film stars Lennie James and Louis Gossett, Jr. The movie’s producer, Lisa Cortes, will attend the Black Bottom Film Festival.

February 25

12:30 p.m.

Pittsburgh Short Films

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Night Shift

The Pittsburgh Short Films program will present two selections, Night Shift (dir. Marshall Tyler) and Inamorata ( dir. A-lan Holt). In Night Shift, a night in the life of a bathroom attendant at a Los Angeles nightclub goes haywire. In Inamorata, a clairvoyant woman finds something unexpected during an intimate encounter with her fiancé’s lover.

1:30 p.m.

Magnificent Life of Charlie (dir. Bobby Huntley)

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After her sister Brandy’s untimely death, everyone is taken aback by Charlie’s unorthodox (and seemingly chipper) approach to her grieving process. Follow Charlie and her friends Kayla and Keturah as they go along for a wild, hilariously exhilarating and bittersweet ride – which will surely be the craziest day of Charlie’s life. A Q&A with director Bobby Huntley and star Ashley Evans will take place before the screening.

4 p.m.

Last Life (dir. Michael Phillip Edwards)

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Produced written and directed by Michael Phillip Edwards, Last Life is a tale about two African-American lovers who learn they’ve been together over the course of many lifetimes and that they must come to terms with the purpose of their repeated union. They are told by their doppelganger spirits that they only have days to live and achieve their goal (healing the divide between a former slave woman and slave man) after which they will die and never return. Edwards stars in the film as well, along with Tamika Lamison and Kobe Reverditto. A Q&A with Edwards and Lamison will take place before the screening.

6:30 p.m.

Betty Davis: They Say I’m Different (dir. Phil Cox)

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Betty Davis is known for her outsized life, fashion and music in 1970s America. She arrived on the scene to break boundaries for women with her daring personality, iconic fashion style, and outrageous funk. But her raunchy lyrics and explosive stage energy clashed with the race and gender stereotypes of her time, leading the NAACP and black middle class to object to her music and boycott her performances. She befriended Jimi Hendrix and Sly Stone, wrote songs for the Chambers Brothers and the Commodores, and married Miles Davis, turning him from jazz to funk. Then she vanished. The documentary explores how she became a major influence on a diverse array of artists. A Q&A with director Phil Cox will take place before the screening.

8 p.m.

Black Bottom Film Festival Closing Reception

All events take place at the August Wilson Center unless otherwise noted. Tickets cost $25 for a day pass $55 for a festival pass, and are available for purchase online, over the phone at (412) 456-6666 or in person at the Theater Square Box Office.

Harry Potter Film & Cultural Festival Returns To Row House Cinema

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Harry Potter and The Order of the Phoenix/Warner Bros.

Row House Cinema will cast a spell on local film fans when it presents the 2018 Harry Potter Film & Cultural Festival.

From February 16 – 28, the theater will rollout a host of Potter-themed events on-site and at various venues throughout Lawrenceville. The schedule includes a family-friendly Wizarding Weekend, where adults and children can take part in hands-on activities such as Herbology Classes at Reed&Co, a free Potions Lab in the Bierport taproom (AKA The Leaky Cauldron), and a specially curated, wizard-themed local vendor fair at Belvedere’s Ultra Dive. Grown-up Potterheads can enjoy such adult-oriented fun as live music from the Pittsburgh wizard rock band Muggle Snuggle and butterbeer tasting. There will also be sorting hat ceremonies, trivia nights, fortune telling, and more.

Of course, the theater will also show all eight of the Harry Potter films, with many screenings featuring extra fun twists such as drag queen storytime, a live owl appearance courtesy of Humane Animal Rescue, and Weasley Sweater Night, where guests who wear an ugly sweater and get $1 off concessions.

Tickets for individual films and events are available at the Row House website. Please note that many festival events may already be sold out – check the festival’s Facebook page for more details.

ASCEND Hosts First Pittsburgh 5Point Film Festival

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For the past 10 years, the 5Point Adventure Film Festival has showcased inspiring outdoor films, art, and performances at events in Colorado, North Carolina, and Washinton. Now, 5Point will inspire local audiences to pursue their own amazing experiences with the first-ever 5Point Film Festival Pittsburgh.

On February 3, 5Point Film Festival Pittsburgh will gather area outdoor enthusiasts for an evening of movies, recreation, refreshments, and more at the ASCEND: Pittsburgh indoor rock climbing gym. The festivities begin at 4 p.m. with fun activities such as slacklining, crate-stacking, and wall climbing, food and beverages, gear, and raffles. Raffle drawings and film screenings begin at 7 p.m. 

Tickets for 5Point Film Festival Pittsburgh cost $5 in advance at Eventbrite, $10 at the door. The event is a collaboration of ASCEND: Pittsburgh, the upcoming gear shop, 3 Rivers Outdoor Company, and Cultivate. Raffle proceeds will go to the Southwestern Pennsylvania Climbers Coalition and First Waves.