Russian Film Symposium Gets To The Bottom Of The Middle Class

kokoko-image

From April 29th to May 4th, the University of Pittsburgh and Pittsburgh Filmmakers will present the 15th Annual Russian Film Symposium, an event that showcases new Russian films and features internationally recognized scholars in Film Studies and Slavic. This year’s theme, Re-Imagining Class: Recent Russian Cinema, will focus on the contradictions between the actual living conditions of the post-Soviet middle class (especially in major cities) and how these lives are represented in Russian cinema of the past decade.

April 29th

Chapiteau-Show I (2011) and Chapiteau-Show II (2011)

Chapiteau-Show I, a surreal cabaret comedy from director Sergei Loban, examines a Crimean resort town’s debilitating effect on basic human relationships in four intersecting episodes, each about a different kind of love between people. The film will be introduced by Terrence Smith, Andrew W. Mellon Professor of Contemporary Art History and Theory in the Department of the History of Art and Architecture at Pitt. Screening takes place at 9 a.m. in Room 106 of David Lawrence Hall.

Chapiteau-Show II examines personal relationship, featuring a father-and-son story and an impersonator of Soviet musician Viktor Tsoi. The film will be introduced by Ana Olenina, assistant professor of Film Studies at the University of North Carolina-Wilmington. A response from Trevor Wilson, a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures at Pitt, will follow the film. Screening takes place at 2 p.m. in Room 106 of David Lawrence Hall.

April 30th

Generation P (2011)

Adapted from a novel by Viktor Pelevin, Generation P uses the story of an advertising copywriter to explore themes of post-Soviet Russian life. The film will be introduced by Barbara Wurm, with a response from Irina Anisimova, PhD candidate in Pitt’s Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, to follow the film. Screening takes place at 9 a.m. in Room 106 of David Lawrence Hall.

generation-p-image

Dukhless (2012)

This consumer love story tells the story of hedonistic Max as he begins to reexamine his life. The film will be introduced by Masha Salazkina, and followed by a response from Olga Mukhortova, Ph.D. candidate in Pitt’s Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures. Screening takes place at 2 p.m. in Room 106 of David Lawrence Hall.

May 1st

White Moor (2011)

Directed by Dmitrii Fiks, White Moor follows the troubled personal lives of three professionally successful men in a loose adaptation of Shakespeare’s Othello. The film will be introduced by Lucy Fischer, Distinguished Professor of English and Film Studies at Pitt. A response from Theodora Kelly Trimble, Ph.D. candidate in Pitt’s Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, will follow the film. Screening takes place at 9 a.m. in Room 106 of David Lawrence Hall.

Kokoko (2012)

Director Avdotya Smirnova‘s Kokoko tells the story of the friendship between Vika, a woman from the provinces, and the more worldly Liza, who met by chance in a train compartment on the way to St. Petersburg. The film will be introduced by Barbara Wurm. Showtime is 7:30 p.m. at Pittsburgh Filmmakers.

May 2nd

An Office Romance: Our Time (2011)

Remake of the classic 1977 Soviet comedy Office Romance. The film will be introduced by Inna Khatkovskaya, lecturer at the Department of Media at the European Humanities University in Vilnius, Lithuania. Natalia Ryabchikova, Ph.D. candidate in Pitt’s Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, will provide a response to the film. Screening takes place at 9 a.m. in Room 106 of David Lawrence Hall.

Rita’s Last Fairy Tale (2012)

This art-house chick flick from director Renata Litvinova tells the story of terminally ill Rita and her caretaker, Tania, the angel of death in disguise. The film will be introduced by Natascha Drubek. Showtime is 7:30 p.m. at Pittsburgh Filmmakers.

RitasLastFairyTale

May 3rd

Twilight Portrait (2011)

A rape-revenge melodrama, Twilight Portrait deals with a range of issues affecting contemporary Russia, including sexual violence, dysfunctional families, child abuse, and police brutality. The film will be introduced by Greg Dolgopolov and a response from Kiun Hwang, Ph.D. candidate in Pitt’s Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, will follow the film. Screening takes place at 9 a.m. in Room 106 of David Lawrence Hall.

Elena (2011)

A meditation on morality, history, and social relationships, director Andrei Zviagintsev‘s film depicts the social and cultural divisions among inhabitants of an exclusive Moscow apartment. The film will be introduced by Natascha Drubek, with a response from Gerald McCausland, director of Pitt’s Russian language program. Screening takes place at 2 p.m. in Room 106 of David Lawrence Hall.

elena-image

Gromozeka (2011)

Gromozeka traces the reunion of three high school friends and former bandmates, exploring the lives they’ve made. The film will be introduced by Greg Dolgopolov. Showtime is 7:30 p.m. at Pittsburgh Filmmakers.

May 4th

Short Stories (2012)

Director Mikhail Segal‘s cinematographic mosaic of Russian literary identity presents a fiction manuscript that influences the lives of those who come in contact with it. The film will be introduced by Gerald Mccausland. Showtime is 7:30 p.m. at Pittsburgh Filmmakers.

short-stories

All films are in Russian with English subtitles. Films shown on Pitt’s campus are free and open to the public. Admission to the Pittsburgh Filmmaker screenings is $4 for Pitt, Carnegie Mellon University, and Art Institute of Pittsburgh students, $7 for students from other institutions, and $8 for non-students.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s