Tull Family Theater Launches Cultural Screenings With ‘Hermitage Revealed’

hermitage

Hermitage Revealed

The Tull Family Theater recently opened in Sewickley to bring art films and events to people living outside of the city of Pittsburgh. The theater lives up to its mission on March 23 when it kicks off its Cultural Screenings series with the sprawling 2014 museum documentary Hermitage Revealed.

The State Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg is one of the largest and oldest museums in the world holding over 3 million treasures and boasting more curators than any other art institution. Hermitage Revealed presents a cinematic journey through the museum’s tumultuous 250-year history and offers unprecedented access to special collections and exclusive areas that remain hidden from the public eye.

The production brings together the oldest, the rarest, the most precious and the most closely guarded of Russia’s greatest treasures; items bought with great wealth or acquired by other means, items hoarded and saved from violent revolutionaries, items thought lost and later re-found – all works and their unique stories presented with an intimacy and immediacy that no museum or gallery experience can match. From Rembrandt to Russian masterpieces, from prehistoric artifacts to the private gemstone collection of Catherine The Great, from Michelangelo to Matisse and much, much more, the exquisite treasures the Hermitage has to offer are seemingly endless.

Hermitage Revealed begins at 7 p.m. Tickets are available for purchase online or at the door.

University Of Pittsburgh Presents Serbian Movie Festival

Enclave

Enclave

From March 17-18, the University of Pittsburgh‘s Center for Russian and Eastern European Studies and the Serbian National Federation will present the Serbian Movie Festival, two days of narrative and documentary films about Serbian history and culture.

See film schedule and details below:

March 17

6 p.m.

Enclave (2015, dir. Goran Radovanovic)

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A Christian boy, determined to create a proper community burial for his late grandfather, crosses enemy lines and makes friends among the Muslim majority in deeply divided, war-torn Kosovo.

8 p.m.

Where the Yellow Lemon Blooms (2006, dir. Zdravko Sotra)

A documentary about the suffering of the Serbian people and its army in WWI.

March 18

12 p.m.

We Will Be the World Champions (2015, dir. Darko Bajić)

World-Champions

A film about the founders of the famous Yugoslav Basketball School and the first gold medal at the Championships in Ljubljana in 1970. Based on a true story.

2:30 p.m.

See You in Montevideo (2014, dir. Dragan Bjelogrlić)

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A football team from Belgrade, in the former Yugoslavia, gets a chance to go to the First World Football Championship, but things get complicated along the way.

The Man Who Defended Gavrilo Princip (2014, dir. Srđan Koljević)

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The film follows the investigation and trial following the Sarajevo assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand in 1914, which triggered the First World War. The courtroom drama is seen through the eyes of Rudolf Zistler, one of the attorneys appointed by the court to defend the 24 accused members of Young Bosnia and assassin Gavrilo Princip.

The Serbian Movie Festival will take place in Room 232 of the Cathedral of Learning. The event is free and open to the public.

Chatham University Uncovers Horrific Canadian Mystery With ‘Finding Dawn’

finding_dawn

Finding Dawn

In Canada, hundreds of women – a majority of them indigenous – have become victim to a decades-long epidemic of disappearances and murder. On March 16, Chatham University and the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh will delve into this atrocity with an International Women’s Day screening of the documentary Finding Dawn.

Finding Dawn puts a human face on a tragedy that has received precious little attention – and one which is surprisingly similar to the situation in Ciudad Juarez, on the other side of the U.S. border. Dawn Crey, Ramona Wilson, and Daleen Kay Bosse are just three of the estimated 500 Aboriginal women who have gone missing or been murdered in Canada over the past 30 years. Acclaimed Métis filmmaker Christine Welsh embarks on an epic journey to shed light on these murders and disappearances that remain unresolved to this day. She begins at Vancouver’s skid row where more than 60 poor women disappeared and travels to the Highway of Tears in northern British Columbia where more than two dozen women (all but one Native) have vanished.

This film illustrates the deep historical, social and economic factors that contribute to the epidemic of violence against Aboriginal women. It highlights the disturbing, worldwide culture of impunity that allows murders of women – especially those who are poor, indigenous, or sex workers – to go unsolved and unpunished.

The Finding Dawn screening event begins at 5 p.m. at Chatham’s Laughlin Hall. Dinner is included. Welsh will give a post-screening interview via Skype with Dr. Prajna Parasher, director of Chatham’s Film and Digital Technology program. There will also a discussion on human trafficking of women and girls led by Dr. Mary Burke, professor of psychology at Carlow University and founder of the Project to End Human Trafficking.

Registration for this event is closed. Those interested in attending can email Nayab Khan at nayab@worldpittsburgh.org to be added to a waiting list.

Row House Raises Money For LGBTQ+ Youth With ‘Philadelphia’ Screenings

philadelphia

Philadelphia

In 1993, Philadelphia became one of the first mainstream films to depict the struggles of people living with HIV/AIDS. On March 13 and 15, Row House Cinema hosts two fundraiser screenings of the drama for the Pittsburgh-based LGBTQ+ organization Proud Haven.

Hailed as a landmark film, Philadelphia stars Tom Hanks and Denzel Washington as two competing lawyers who join forces to sue a prestigious law firm for AIDS discrimination. As their unlikely friendship develops, their courage overcomes the prejudice and corruption of their powerful adversaries. Hanks went on to win the Best Actor Academy Award for his performance.

The Philadelphia benefit screenings take place on March 13 at 7 p.m. and March 15 at 9 p.m. Tickets cost $11. $3 of each ticket sold will go towards Proud Haven, a nonprofit organization dedicated to helping homeless and unstably housed LGBTQ+ youth in the Pittsburgh region find resources and housing options. The screenings are presented as part of Row House’s Denzel Washingon week.

Horror Realm Returns With Celebrity-Filled Spring Convention

slumberparty

The Slumber Party Massacre

Horror Realm blows in this March with plenty of movies, events, merchandise and guests appearances to excite area horror fans.

The latest annual spring show takes place from March 3-5 at the DoubleTree by Hilton in Green Tree and features a 10,000-square-foot dealer room with vendors selling DVDs, collectible figures, t-shirts, posters, jewelry, and clothing. There’s also a film program, celebrity Q&A sessions, costume and tattoo contests, and parties.

The guest lineup includes Diane Franklin (Better Off Dead, Amityville II: The Possession, TerrorVision), Phantasm franchise star Reggie BannisterTuesday Knight (Nightmare on Elm Street 4: The Dream Master), Tiffany Shepis (Sharknado 2: The Second One, Tales of Halloween, Nightmare Man) and many more.

knight

Tuesday Knight

The schedule features screenings of local films such as Possessed – The Making of The Redsin Tower by Toe Tag Productions and CarousHELL by Silver Spotlight Films, as well as the 1982 slasher hit The Slumber Party Massacre. There will also be a tribute to the late midnight movie icon Chilly Billy Cardille, a live Rocky Horror Picture Show shadow cast performance by the JCCP, and a short film showcase.

See a full convention schedule at the Horror Realm website.

Tickets cost $100 for VIP passes, $40 for weekend passes, $15 for Friday, $20 for Saturday and $10 for Sunday.  Active duty military and veterans receive one free single day admission with valid ID. Children 12 and under are free with an adult admission.  Tickets are available for purchase at the door or in advance at Showclix.

Waterworks Cinemas Heads South For ‘Daughters Of The Dust’

daughters-of-the-dust

Daughters of the Dust

On March 1, influential filmmaker Julie Dash visits the Waterworks Cinemas for a screening of her groundbreaking 1991 film Daughters of the Dust. Presented by Requiem for Rice, an organization preserving the memory of the millions of enslaved, exploited and brutalized people who worked the rice plantations of Lowcountry South Carolina and Georgia, the event also serves as a tribute to Gullah food and culture.

Set during the dawn of the 20th century, Daughters of the Dust follows a multi-generational family in the Gullah community on the Sea Islands off of South Carolina – former West African slaves who adopted many of their ancestors’ Yoruba traditions – who struggle to maintain their cultural heritage and folklore while contemplating a migration to the mainland, even further from their roots. The first wide release by a Black female filmmaker, the film has cast a long legacy that still resonates today, most recently as a major in influence on Beyonce’s video album Lemonade.

The event includes a Gullah Geechee food tasting catered by Steeltown Gumbo & Catering, who will offer samples of Nouveau Sweet Tea, shrimp and grits, benne seed wafers with homemade pimento piped rosettes, vegan Hoppin’ John salad and okra stew, Red Requiem Rice, and banana pudding.

The food tasting takes place at 6 p.m. followed by remarks from Dash at 7 p.m.  The film shows at 7:30 p.m. Tickets for the full event cost $25-30 in advance, $35 at the door. Tickets for the screening only cost $10-12 in advance, $15 at the door.

Best Limited Releases Coming To Pittsburgh: March 2017 Edition

The Red Turtle – Regent Square Theater

red-turtle

Through the story of a man shipwrecked on a tropical island inhabited by turtles, crabs, and birds, The Red Turtle recounts the milestones in the life of a human being. The Red Turtle opens on March 3 at the Regent Square Theater.

XX – Hollywood Theater

xx

The all-female helmed horror anthology features four dark tales written and directed by fiercely talented women. Annie Clark, also known as the musician St. Vincent, rocks her directorial debut with The Birthday PartyKaryn Kusama (The Invitation, Girlfight) exorcises Her Only Living SonRoxanne Benjamin (Southbound) screams Don’t FallJovanka Vuckovic (The Captured Bird) dares to open The Box. Award-winning animator Sofia Carrillo (La Casa Triste) wraps together four suspenseful stories of terror featuring a cast including Natalie Brown, Melanie Lynskey, Breeda Wool and Christina Kirk. XX opens on March 4 at the Hollywood Theater.

Kedi – Manor Theatre

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Hundreds of thousands of Turkish cats roam the metropolis of Istanbul freely. For thousands of years, they’ve wandered in and out of people’s lives, becoming an essential part of the communities that make the city so rich. Claiming no owners, the cats of Istanbul live between two worlds, neither wild nor tame — and they bring joy and purpose to those people they choose to adopt. In Istanbul, cats are the mirrors to the people, allowing them to reflect on their lives in ways nothing else could. Kedi opens on March 24 at the Manor Theatre.

Raw – Hollywood Theater

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Everyone in Justine’s family is a vet. And a vegetarian. At 16, she’s a brilliant and promising student. When she starts at veterinary school, she enters a decadent, merciless and dangerously seductive world. During the first week of hazing rituals, desperate to fit in whatever the cost, she strays from her family principals when she eats raw meat for the first time. Justine will soon face the terrible and unexpected consequences of her actions as her true self begins to emerge. Raw opens on March 24 at the Hollywood Theater.

August Wilson Center Presents Black Bottom Film Festival

COOLEY HIGH (1975)

Cooley High

The Pittsburgh Cultural Trust and the August Wilson Center will showcase African-American contributions to the silver screen with the first-ever Black Bottom Film Festival (BBFF). The event takes place from February 24-26 and includes a selection of features, shorts and documentaries that “parallel the reoccurring themes of spirituality, family conflict, race and working class struggle that serve as the foundation for August Wilson’s award-winning and internationally renowned Pittsburgh Cycle plays.”

The festival will also recognize the creative contributions of filmmaker Michael Schultz. As one of the first African-American directors hired by the major studios, Schultz opened the doors for directors of color with such features as Car Wash, Krush Groove and The Last Dragon. His career has spanned more than four decades and includes films, children’s programming, and television episodes for series such as Blackish, New Girl, My Crazy-Ex-Girlfriend and Arrow.

See event schedule and details below:

February 24

5 p.m.

Post-Racial Cinema: Black Film in The Obama Age

Reelblack Podcast co-hosts Mike D. and Charles Woods identify trends and milestones in Black films released from 2008-2016.

6:15 p.m.

Friday Night Shorts

Selections include Dream (dir. Nijla Mu’min), A Day in the Life of a Hashtag and African in America (dir. Njaimeh Njie), Ghetto Steps (dir. Emmai Alaquiva), and Father’s Day (dir. Demetrius Wren).

8 p.m.

Chapter & Verse (dir. Jamal Joseph)

chapter-verse

After serving eight years in prison, reformed gang leader S. Lance Ingram re-enters society and struggles to adapt to a changed Harlem. Living under the tough supervision of a parole officer in a halfway house, he is unable to find a job that will let him use the technological skills he gained in prison. Lance is forced to take a job delivering for a food pantry where he befriends Ms. Maddy, a strong and spirited grandmother, and assumes responsibility for her 15-year-old grandson Ty, a promising student who is pulled into a dangerous street gang. When gang members decide to punish Ty for disobeying the “law of the streets,” Lance risks sacrificing his “second chance” at freedom so that Ty can have a “first chance” at a better life. Starring Daniel Beaty, Omari Hardwick, Loretta Devine and Selenis Leyva.

February 25

11 a.m.

Saturday at the Cine 

fathers-day

Screenings include the short Father’s Day from University of Pittsburgh professor Demetrius Wren and the documentary Agents of Change by Frank Dawson. Includes Q&As with Wren and Dawson.

2:30 p.m.

Michael Schultz Q&A

Schultz sits down for a conversation with the newly appointed CEO of Pittsburgh Filmmakers/Pittsburgh Center for the Arts, Germaine Williams.

4 p.m.

Like Cotton Twines (dir. Leila Djansi)

like-cotton-twines

Jay Ellis (The GameInsecure) plays an American volunteer who takes a teaching job in a Ghanaian village. There he meets a bright girl who must atone for a deadly accident committed by her father and, according to custom, must abandon her education to be offered into religious slavery.

6:30 p.m.

Evening Cinematics

cooleyhigh-small

Michael Schultz will receive an award commissioned Pittsburgh-based artist Thad Mosley during the BBFF for Cinematic Excellence Ceremony. The evening includes a retrospective of Schultz’s work and a screening of Cooley High, his 1975 film about a group of teenage friends living in 1964 Chicago.

10 p.m.

Late Night Feature

which-way

See a late night screening of Which Way Is Up?, Michael Schultz’s 1977 comedy starring Richard Pryor in multiple roles.

February 26

1 p.m.

Spirits of Rebellion: Black Cinema from U.C.L.A. (dir. Zeinabu Irene Davis)

spirits-rebellion

Documentary filmmaker Zeinabu Irene Davis goes behind and in front of the camera as she profiles several filmmakers identified with the L.A. Rebellion, including Charles Burnett, Ben Caldwell, Julie Dash, Haile Gerima, Barbara McCullough, and Billy Woodberry.

2:15 p.m.

Destination Planet Negro (dir. Kevin Willmott)

planet-n

In 1939, a group of African-American intellectuals come up with an ingenious and unlikely response to Jim Crow America – leave the planet and populate Mars. Using technology created by George Washington Carver, a three-person crew and one rambunctious robot lift-off in Earth’s first working spaceship on a mission that will take them to a world not unlike present-day America. Their spacey adventure illuminates some hard truths about American culture and threatens to undermine the timeline of history along the way.

5:30 p.m.

Two Trains Runnin’ (dir. Sam Pollard)

two-trains

The feature-length documentary by filmmaker Sam Pollard pays tribute to a pioneering generation of musicians and cuts to the heart of our present moment, offering a crucial vantage from which to view the evolving dynamics of race in America. The film is narrated by Common and features the music of Gary Clark Jr.

All events take place at the August Wilson Center. A Q&A will follow each screening. Tickets cost $15 for a single-day pass and $35 for a festival pass and are available for purchased online, over the phone at (412) 456-6666 or in person at the Theater Square Box Office. Tickets will also be sold, based on availability, two hours before the event time at the August Wilson Center’s box office located at the venue.

Row House Casts A Spell With Harry Potter Film And Cultural Festival

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Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone

Muggles and wizards alike will have loads of fun when Row House Cinema and its sister store, Bierport, host the Harry Potter Film And Cultural Festival. The event will feature two weeks of live music, themed food and drinks, and, of course, film screenings dedicated to one of the most successful and widely beloved YA series in history.

The itinerary includes regular showings of the Harry Potter screen adaptations. Starting in 2001 with Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone and ending with the two-part finale Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, the expansive franchise follows the adventures of the young wizard Harry (Daniel Radcliffe) and his best friends Ron (Rupert Grint) and Hermione (Emma Watson) as they hone their magic skills at the Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. Along the way, they face increasing peril as they unravel the mysterious connection between Harry and the evil Lord Voldemort (Ralph Fiennes), whose band of rogue wizards are intent on destroying Harry along with anyone who stands in their way.

During the festival, fans young and old can enjoy a number of other activities, including a performance by the Harry Potter tribute band Muggle Snuggle, storytime with the Carnegie Library, and a house sorting night where people can discover if they belong to Gryffindor, Hufflepuff, Ravenclaw or Slytherin. There will also be crafts, trivia, costume contests, and treats of both the alcoholic and kid-safe variety.

The Harry Potter Film And Cultural Festival runs from February 17March 2. Tickets and additional information about the event are available at the Row House website.

Big Idea Bookstore And Redneck Revolt Present ‘Matewan’ Screening

matewan

Matewan

On February 11, the Big Idea Bookstore and the Pittsburgh chapter of Redneck Revolt, a national network dedicated to anti-capitalist and anti-racist organizing in poor and working-class white communities, will present a screening and discussion of the film Matewan.

The acclaimed 1987 historical drama from director John Sayles depicts the events leading up to the real-life Battle of Matewan. Chris Cooper stars as a union organizer sent in to rally exploited local, immigrant and Black coal miners in 1920 West Virginia. When thugs from a notorious detective agency are sent in to terrorize and evict striking miners, it soon leads to one of the bloodiest clashes in American labor union history.

Matewan screens at 5:30 p.m. Afterwards, Redneck Revolt will lead a discussion about the themes of class, race, labor militancy and working-class rebellion presented in the film. Food will be provided and guests are welcome to bring something to share. A donation of $5 is suggested but not required.